The Lost Art of Closing by Anthony Iannarino — Book Review and Summary

The Lost Art of Closing — For decades, sales managers, coaches, and authors talked about closing as the most essential, most difficult phase of selling. They invented pushy tricks for the final ask, from the “take delivery” close to the “now or never” close. But these tactics often alienated customers, leading to fads for the “soft” close or even abandoning the idea of closing altogether. It sounded great in theory, but the results were often mixed or poor. That left a generation of salespeople wondering how they should think about closing, and what strategies would lead to the best possible outcomes.

4.39 (174 ratings by Goodreads)

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The Lost Art of Closing — Book Review

I would rate the book at 7/10★ . Great reading material for salesman, network marketing agent or any aspiring businessman. Anthony Iannarino believes that many salespeople have no practical knowledge of how to make productive conversations with clients. It is kind of odd since the salesperson words can either make or break the sale.

I used to be able to close a tremendous amount of sales per day selling products (electronics, gadgets and computers) which I trust and personally used. But were horrendously terrible at selling stuff which I didn’t use or even confident it. I believe it is a part of lessons to learn and still being learnt. So, it seems that the seller confidence is monumental in closing a deal.

The typical salesperson might say, “What’s it going to take to get you to sign this contract?” In contrast, the salesperson could say, “Can you share your concerns with me so I can make sure this works for you?”

This question focuses on the client’s needs and should result in useful information that leads to a sale.

Iannarino’s bestseller outlines his well-developed closing strategies, provides numerous field-tested conversational nuggets salespeople can use to encourage clients to sign up.  Although, try not to look like you’re reading a script. That would definitely put people off.

Therefore, if you have anything to do with sales, get this book. It’s awesome!

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The Lost Art of Closing: Winning the Ten Commitments That Drive SalesThe Lost Art of Closing: Winning the Ten Commitments That Drive Sales by Anthony Iannarino


I would rate the book at 7/10★ . Great reading material for salesman, network marketing agent or any aspiring businessman. Anthony Iannarino believes that many salespeople have no practical knowledge of how to make productive conversations with clients. It is kind of odd since the salesperson words can either make or break the sale.
.
I used to be able to close a tremendous amount of sales per day selling products (electronics, gadgets and computers) which I trust and personally used. But were horrendously terrible at selling stuff which I didn’t use or even confident it. I believe it is a part of lessons to learn and still being learnt. So, it seems that the seller confidence is monumental in closing a deal.
.
The typical salesperson might say, “What’s it going to take to get you to sign this contract?” In contrast, the salesperson could say, “Can you share your concerns with me so I can make sure this works for you?”
.
This question focuses on the client’s needs and should result in useful information that leads to a sale.
.
Iannarino’s bestseller outlines his well-developed closing strategies, provides numerous field-tested conversational nuggets salespeople can use to encourage clients to sign up. Although, try not to look like you’re reading a script. That would definitely put people off.
.
source :https://aarifbillah.com/2019…

View all my reviews

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The Lost Art of Closing — Book Summary

Always or Never

There’s a sentiment for a salesperson to either be always closing or never closing. Finding the best way to close a sale can be confusing. Why? Some ‘expert’ says — always be closing. Others say — never be closing.

So which one is the right way?

Pushy manipulative salespeople usually work the always-be-closing way. That advice feeds their insatiable hunger for commissions. Hence, they constantly press clients to agree to commitments before they’ve gained their customers’ trust, delivered value or earned permission to even make such requests. Often, they see their clients’ concerns as insignificant. Nothing matters to them except closing.

The tide shifted with the development of “the Internet, social selling, content marketing and inbound” sales. Salespeople are no longer in charge. Today, clients hold cards. Many salespeople have adjusted to this challenging environment by moving away from the always-be-closing approach to adopt its complete opposite: the never-be-closing tactic.

In this mode, salespeople never ask for an order. They passively put clients in complete charge of the selling process, which may meander along and never amount to a concrete deal.

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The Power of Commitment

“Although you may think that your client is only buying the value in your product, service or solution, the truth is that you are the larger part of the value proposition.”

The salesperson who uses this “philosophy for closing” is always closing, but not to get the client to buy something. Instead, the salesperson constantly closes to secure 10 specific commitments from the client that advance the sale, step by step.

And in order to utilise this power of commitment, you’ll need these 10 commitments and also the proper mindset which makes the backbone of a great salesperson:

The 10 Commitments

(1) The commitment for time

With this difficult-to-achieve commitment, the salesperson secures a client meeting. Never use email to ask for your client’s time. Use the phone. Ask only for time – nothing else. Be prepared for a no. Promise to deliver true value – but don’t make a pitch for your product.

Ask again for an appointment (ask three times in total, but no more than that). Say you need only 20 minutes and promise not to waste the client’s time.

(2) The commitment to explore

This secures the client’s willingness to “explore change.” Explain why it’s in his or her best interest to change. Discuss your client’s business threats and opportunities. After your first meeting, ask for a second session that focuses on discovery. In early meetings, stay away from slide presentations and product discussions. Use your business knowledge to establish your credibility as a viable business partner.

(3) The commitment to change

This is the primary element in the selling process. Ask certain questions to get the client to see the need to change, such as, “Are the problems we’ve been discussing the right ones for you and your team to work on right now?” Your discussions with clients must be difficult to be meaningful.

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(4) The commitment to collaborate

You must adapt your solution to your clients’ needs, which you can identify through collaboration. The salesperson and the client must become strategic partners, but the salesperson must secure a commitment from the client in order for this collaboration to occur. Involve the client in developing the solution. Change “your” solution into a solution you share with your client.

(5) The commitment to build consensus

Complex B2B sales involve multiple stakeholders. You must achieve consensus. Identify your major stakeholders and determine what will motivate them to choose your proposal. Your main contact may not want to reveal who the stakeholders are. Explain that failing to include all stakeholders in developing a solution can backfire. They may resent being excluded, and they could oppose any proposed solution for that reason.

(6) The commitment to invest

Every sale requires the client to invest “time, energy and capital.” You have reached the point where you must discuss price – now, not at the end of the sales process, as is often customary. If you hold off until then, your client will end up comparing your prices against your competitors’ prices. This usually translates to a bidding war. Bringing up price early also gets rid of prospects who waste your time.

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(7) The commitment to review

Now the time has come to make a presentation to all the client’s stakeholders. Secure a commitment from the client for a “preproposal meeting review.” You and the relevant parties on the client’s side should put your heads together before you develop the full proposal. Create the initial proposal and then solicit feedback from all relevant stakeholders. Apply the feedback you receive to tailor the proposal.

(8) The commitment to resolve concerns

Clients fear changes, including buying and using your offering. Secure a commitment that will permit them to air their concerns. Usually, clients’ issues are equal to their fears. You must put those fears to rest to close the sale. Clients will carefully observe whether you can make tough decisions, provide useful advice, fix problems and answer questions.

(9) The commitment to decide

Secure a commitment from the client to buy. This is when you and your client become partners. This is an easy commitment to secure if you have moved successfully through all of the previous commitments. If you haven’t, this will be the most challenging one, but you don’t need any special closing tricks to secure this commitment.

(10) The commitment to execute

A sale that doesn’t deliver the goods is not just a big problem for the client; it’s also a big problem for the salesperson – a black mark on his or her professional reputation. Winning additional sales is tough if you have a reputation for selling inferior products or services that don’t do what they are supposed to do. Therefore, you must secure the opportunity to present methods and usage details after the sale so you can enable clients to achieve complete success with the product or service they purchased. Think of this as the clients’ commitment to execute.

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The Proper Salesperson Mindset for Success

However, in order to make any of this possible, you’ll need the proper mindset. And this mindset has six crucial factors:

(1) Confidence

Believe in yourself and in your offering. You must be certain that it’s exactly what your clients need.

(2) Caring

Focus on your customers, their companies and their needs. You must truly care about them.

(3) Persistence

Like everyone else, clients prefer the status quo. Gaining sales commitments involves change, which never comes easy. You must be persistent in helping your client want and bring about the change your solution requires.

(4) Speaking from the client’s mind

When you speak to your client, always adjust what you say to reflect the “client’s needs, challenges and goals.”

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(5) Embracing concerns

Sales experts have long taught salespeople they must overcome clients’ objections. Instead, “embrace and resolve” customers’ worries. Help your clients face their fears.

(6) Realizing it’s not about you

How could the sales process centre on you? You’re not the person with a problem that needs solving. All interactions between you and your client must centre on the client.

Concluding Remark

If you wish to be a great salesperson. Then this is the book for you! Another worthwhile reading on sales — More Sales, Less Time.

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Author: Muhamad Aarif

A notorious book addict by night and an oil and gas executive by day. As Mark Twain said, "The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them." So, read, read, and read some more.

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