How to prioritize your day

Key #1 – Start your day by noting down all the tasks you need to complete

Pick up your pen or smartphone and start writing in your notepad the stuff you need to achieve. This might include things like:

  • going through your emails
  • writing a project document
  • meeting your boss for a catch-up session
  • creating a PowerPoint presentation
  • sorting out your expenses

Key #2 – Sort the tasks into order of importance

The next step is to spend a few minutes putting your tasks into order of priority.

You can do this by looking at which tasks must be finished by the end of the day, which tasks add the most value to your job and the organization, and which tasks would be nice to finish, but are not essential.

By following this method, you’ll be able to quickly break your list down into

  1. MUST do, SHOULD do, and GOOD to do tasks. Or
  2. Urgent & Important, Urgent & Not Important, Not Urgent & Important, Not Urgent & Not Important

Using the list from above, you’ll be able to rearrange this as follows (for example No.1):

  1. creating a PowerPoint presentation (Must do)
  2. writing a project document (Must do)
  3. meeting your boss for a catch-up session (Should do)
  4. going through your emails (Should do)
  5. sorting out your expenses (Good to do)

Key #3 – Start working through the high-priority tasks first

You’re now ready to start work on your most important task. And, once you’ve completed this, you can then move to your next task, and so on and so forth.

By working this way, you’ll ensure that your critical tasks are always completed. And, in most cases, you’ll typically find that you have plenty of time to complete ALL of your daily tasks.

Of course, there may be occasions when your boss suddenly dumps on you some urgent and unexpected work. However, when this happens, instead of having a breakdown (we’ve all been through it!), it’s best to add the new task to your list in the most appropriate ranking – and then carry on working using the Key #3 method.

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Categories: Personal Development

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